S1000rr Dyno results

Started by Thegodfather, November 14, 2019, 06:40:44 pm

Previous topic - Next topic

David W

No such thing as an accurate dyno really. You could run the same bike on the same dyno a week apart and get quite different numbers. Some read lower than others though. Different smoothing factors, SAE vs DIN. Lots of variables.

Thegodfather

Update,,,
Had it done a couple of weeks ago. Now 215.2
Dave reckons 220 is achievable if he can have it for a week. I'm in two minds as to what effect 220 could have on the engine long term.



Alzo

I can't see 5bhp being any harder on the engine.

Thegodfather

You wouldn't think so. But it started out at 197.

Maddog

Dave wouldnt map it if there was a high risk of anything happening as one bad job and he will lose loads of work. With mapping, theres always a risk but if done properly on a rolling road, AFR sensors etc by someone who knows what they are doing then id go for it. Dave does loads of R&D on new bikes and loads of work for race teams so id trust him with any of my bikes.

Thegodfather

Yeah, just I've never dyno'd anything before so all new to me.

Alzo

All said top end power to the detriment of elsewhere may not be the most desirable thing to do.

mc101

Quote from: David W on December 16, 2019, 08:28:54 pmNo such thing as an accurate dyno really. You could run the same bike on the same dyno a week apart and get quite different numbers. Some read lower than others though. Different smoothing factors, SAE vs DIN. Lots of variables.

This .... even the tyre on the bike can make/rob 2-5bhp ... the temperature of the dyno cell, the temperature and speed of intake air, the fuel the bike was loaded with, the --- you get the idea.

The important thing is to have work done in the same dyno (assuming you like the service etc) and then you can compare each run / improvements in a moderately controlled environment.
2015: NLR HT1 Endurance (1st)
2014: ACU National Endurance 1000 (2nd)